Life

Planting the family "tree" - a small blue spruce - in 1947, marking the 100th Anniversary of the Black family's emigration to Innisfil. Submitted

My Canada... The family "tree"

My sister and I search Innisfil Beach Park, east of the picnic pavilion. Where is the blue spruce tree?It was planted on June 28, 1947, 70 years ago, to commemorate 100 years since the Black family first emigrated from Tyrone, Ireland. We left without finding the tree.

John Franklin, describing his arrival at Point Humphreys, used George Back's illustration of the same event.

An early portrait of Canada

When George Back walked through what would soon be Barrie, mid-spring of 1825, he'd already lived an extraordinary life full of adventure and historic acts.

Barrie resident Agnes Bernard married the man who would become Canada's first prime minister, propelling her to the forefront of Canadian high society.

Confederation’s key players

For a place with such a small population, Simcoe County made an incredible contribution to the formation of Canada and Confederation. This column highlights just four of those people.

William Beatty Jr. built an empire of shipping and logging linking Collingwood and Simcoe County with communities along Georgian Bay to the north, especially Parry Sound, which he co-founded.

Georgian Bay formed tight-knit community

Georgian Bay, despite being a far flung area, was a tightly knit neighbourhood. And Collingwood, as a solid and speedy link south from Georgian Bay through Collingwood and Simcoe County, played a prominent role in building and linking that community.

George Millward McDougall

Local farm boy went west

A man who did much to keep Canada together grew up on a farm just outside of Barrie and later honed his skills as a negotiator and religious leader in northern Simcoe County – especially in the area of Rama and Orillia.

Fotolia

Walk for suicide awareness June 3

According to the Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention (CASP), approximately 11 people will end their lives by suicide today in Canada. That equals approximately 4,000 per year. Suicide affects people of all ages and backgrounds and its impact on families and communities can be devastating.